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Mandam harrows and stubble cultivators now at Colac Ag

The GAL-C shown here two rows of 12 discs out to a width of 3m while GAL-K harrows have hydraulic working depth adjustment and come with a transport chassis with pneumatic brakes as standard – they can work soil and trash up to 8m(26ft)

The full range of Mandam disc harrows and stubble cultivators is now available through local distributor Colac Ag.

Mandam is a well-established Polish farm machinery maker with two factories in full production that enables the company to produce over 3500 farm implements a year.

The company has a range of well sought after cultivation models and currently exports to more than 20 countries and this makes up to 70% of its productions run.

Mandam gained a head start when it began making its in-house designed maintenance-free hubs for discs, the product is so stable it carries an unlimited five-year warranty.

The Mandam TAL-C disc harrow is a popular choice from the range in many markets. It is ideal for light top soil cultivation prior to planting or for trashing harvested paddocks.

The notched discs are 560mm (22-in) in diameter and are independently mounted and well protected with a leaf spring suspension.

The TAL-C discs are angled to effectively penetrate the soil and have the added backing of oversized maintenance-free hubs for extra durability.

Many growers will appreciate further options that include rollers and scrapers to achieve the ideal set-up for their operation.

The TAL-C disc harrow can also be paired with an EN electric drive seeder.

The seeder can be used to sow grass seed or other cover crops as well as fertiliser.

Mandam’s TAL-C disc harrow is designed for cultivation in light to medium soils before sowing or after harvest it works across widths from 2.5 to 6m (8 to 20ft)

When a TAL-C disc harrow is coupled with an electric drive EN seeder it has access to a 120-litre product tank and works across widths from 2.5 to 6m (8 to 20ft).

Operators will need tractor power from 59 to 147kW (80-200hp) to run the TAL-C disc harrow range.

Mandam also produce the heavier built GAL disc harrow range that is designed to cultivate and mix soil with crop residue prior to sowing.

GAL disc harrows run at 560mm (22-in) diameter toothed discs that are arranged in two displaced rows, mounted on maintenance-free bearings.

These discs are very effective for cutting and mixing crop stubble as every disc has its own bearing that can be angled towards the direction of the cut.

Mandam claim the toothed discs are more effective as they can penetrate deeper, and the rear roller is able to level out the soil. Theere are two ranges in the GAL disc harrow series.

The GAL-C works two rows of 12 discs out to a width of 3m.

The discs are mounted on maintenance free, sealed bearing hubs.

The working units are mounted to the frame with rubber suspension rollers.

While the heavier built GAL-K offers working widths of 4, 5, 6 and 8m (13, 16, 20 and 26ft).

GAL-K harrows are built on a very sturdy frame, with working units mounted using rubber suspension rollers and maintenance-free bearings.

GAL-K harrows also offer hydraulic working depth adjustment and are fitted with a transport chassis with pneumatic brakes as standard.

Both series of GAL disc harrows, the GAL-K and GAL-C can be combined with an EN electric drive seeder.

With a 120-litre product tank and works across widths from 2.5 to 6m (8 to 20ft).

See more details of the Mandam product line and model availability on the website at: https://www.mandamaustralia.com.au/

To locate your closest dealer, contact Colac Ag on tel: 03 5231 6999, or email to: sales@colacag.com.au.

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