Unstoppable home-grown ground breakers 

Ennor of Deniliquin NSW is one of the country’s very best in the field of deep cultivation, having 40 years of disc plough manufacture under its belt

Ennor Engineering’s 32 Series 12.7 disc plough is built on a 203x102x13mm RHS frame with standard sizes from 3.55 to 12.65m (11.65 to 41.51ft). Available from 28 through to 100 discs in 4 disc steps

With international supply lines severely constrained during the COVID-19 pandemic, local manufacturers like Ennor Engineering have stepped into the breach to satisfy demand for machinery driven by good growing conditions over the majority of the country.

The Ennor company has led the way in Australia in the manufacture of big disc ploughs and has been building machines with 32-inch discs for over 35 years. 

Ennor also pioneered its famous oil-bath hub more than 15 years ago and at the same time released its first 40-inch disc machine.

Another Ennor innovation is the incorporation of bearing hubs machined from solid billet steel because of their huge strength and durability advantage over cast hubs.

Add to that some of the heaviest frame designs available and unparalleled build quality, and there is little wonder Ennor used models attract the highest resale value in the industry.

Ennor Engineering started to install a higher level of build in the early 1980’s with the development of gang hub designs manufactured from billet steel rather than cast iron that was common in the industry at the time.

Billet steel gave Ennor the ability to improve the design at any time required to keep up with market requirements, and also gave buyers the advantage of the strongest and most precise bearing hub in the industry, leading to a longer life.

After a relatively short period the production volume of bearing housings was so great that it would have been far more economical to change to a casting.

Ennor Engineering could have shifted to introducing a more economical change to a casting but made the decision to stick with billet steel bearing housings.

The reasoning it chose the more expensive production path was because Ennor could offer a far more accurate housing for a precision bearing fit.

A housing with so much strength that it would never be broken. This is something Ennor can still state today, even with tens of thousands of gang hubs out in the paddocks, not one has ever been broken.

32 Series

Up close to the Ennor 32 Series 12.7 with disc spacing available in 267mm (10.5in) 267mm (11.25in) (286mm) or 305mm (12in) configured as rigid, swing fold, semi-rigid hydraulic fold, or hydraulic fold

In 1998 Ennor introduced its 32 Series machines, so-called because of their 32-inch maximum disc size.

One of the first models off the production line was a 12.2m (40ft), 96-disc monster weighing in at 22 tonnes, twice the size of any machines competing brands had dared to manufacture up to that point.

The 32 Series has now evolved into three ranges and weight levels, the 32 Series 9.0, 32 Series 12.7 and 32 Series Contractor. Hundreds of models have been manufactured, with even more variants.

36 and 40 Series

Following on its success with the 32 Series, the company embarked on the ambitious development of both the 36 Series and 40 Series, released in 2006 and 2009 respectively.

These models were developed to be unstoppable through any terrain, and to be towed behind the most powerful tractors on the market.

The design brief was straight to the point, make an invincible machine “put the entire weight of the machine on any one point and not worry it.”

The entire structure of these machines was designed using computer-based Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to ensure adequate strength. Every component had to be designed from scratch including the oil-bath gang bearing system.

To ensure reliability the bearing units weigh over 75kg and have a rated capacity of 49 tonnes as compared to a standard plough bearing with a 4.5-tonne capacity.

The first 36 Series machine has now clocked over 8,000 hours of service and is still running the original bearings untouched.

Oil-bath bearings

Ennor’s oil-bath bearing design has been another successful innovation for the company.

Ennor Engineering design and manufacture their own billet steel bearing housings so well they never break

The system had been developed over 10 years based on the experience and knowledge gained from its first use in the 36 and 40 Series models.

Oil-bath bearings feature billet steel components, tapered roller bearings manufactured in Japan and duo-cone seals manufactured in Germany.

The bearing system is expected to give a service life of 5,000 hours, with the only maintenance required being a periodical checking of the oil level and oil changes.

The oil-bath bearing system has now made its way onto the 28 Series, 28 Series Contractor, 32 Series 9.0, 32 Series 12.7 and 32 Series Contractor.

The main problem faced during the development was to produce an extremely strong and reliable system at an affordable price.

The Ennor system is now the benchmark, as it is the only oil-bath gang bearing system designed and manufactured in Australia for local conditions.

Another development that has been filtering into Ennor models over recent years the use of hardened pins on pivot points.

This is something generally only seen on machinery like Caterpillar bulldozers because of the high cost of manufacture. Ennor has invested in specialised machinery to be able to produce this highly advantageous addition at an affordable price.

32 Series 12.7

Other key ranges that are popular with large-scale farmers and contractors include the 32 Series 12.7 with working discs ranging from 28 to 100 plates.

Working with 32-inch discs the 12.5mm RHS Frame has a 50mm (2-inch) gang axle that runs either Aircraft or Ag tyres.

The oil-bath gang bearing option is recommended for users wanting thousands of hours of service for this true all-rounder. The 32 Series has been developed for cereal, sugar cane, and cotton crops, and is also ideal for handling re-growth.

32 Series Contractor

Ennor’s 36 Series Generation II was released in 2019 to run lower cost 36-inch discs ranging from 24 to 48 plates. Standard working widths are 4.02 to 6.88m (13.18 to 22.58ft)

Ennor’s 32 Series Contractor is a more recent addition to the range with working discs ranging from 28 to 72 plates.

The 32-inch discs are 12mm on the front, while 10mm are fitted to the rear. The 16mm RHS Frame has a (2-inch) gang axle that runs either Aircraft or Solid tyres.

These contractor models have been developed for working with bulldozers through any re-growth and are also used for many cotton and sugar cane operations.

36 Series Generation II

 Ennor’s 36 Series Generation II was released in 2019 as a lower cost 36-inch disc machine ranging from 24 to 48 plates. Standard working widths are 4.02 to 6.88m (13.18 to 22.58ft).

The 36-inch discs are 12mm for both the front and rear. While the 16mm RHS frame has a 50mm (2-inch) gang axle that runs either Aircraft or Solid tyres.

This range is capable of penetrating down to 355mm (14-inches) deep and is ideal for clearing re-growth, and any very deep tillage applications in sugar cane, cotton and even land forming.

These machines offer an average weight of 2,500kg for each metre of cut.

42 Series

Ennor 42 Series machines is where stubborn pans or re-growth have to yield. Big 42-inch discs simply cut through anything the 24 to 44 plate sections come across. Standard working widths are 4.02 to 6.88m (13.18 to 22.58ft)

Ennor’s 42 Series machines is where stubborn pans or growth have to yield. Big 42-inch discs simply cut through anything the 24 to 44 plate sections come across. Standard working widths are 4.02 to 6.88m (13.18 to 22.58ft)

The 42-inch discs are 12mm for both the front and rear with an optional 20-inch by 8mm backing disc. The 16mm RHS frame has a 90mm (3.5-inch) gang axle that runs either Aircraft or Solid tyres. Oil-bath gang bearings are standard.

This range is capable of penetrating down to 400mm (16-inches) deep and is ideal for clearing re-growth as they can reach below the root system of many types of shrubs.

This is the model you need to couple with a bulldozer and for a primary cultivation machine. The average weight is 3,940kg for each metre of cut.

The gang angle and overall design of Ennor models allows operators to apply the minimum level of power to ensure low running costs. While also self-sharpening the discs and achieving the required depth and tilth of the soil across all operations.

Contact Ennor Engineering for any specialised build or production model availability for the coming season on tel: 1800 813 115, or email to: craig.ennor@ennor.com.au